flavorpill:

What’s on the other side of some of these classic covers?

Famous Album Covers in Reverse 

soundbitecity:

No Surface Without a Seat

Berlin isn’t the warmest of places, so I was continually surprised by the amount of outdoor seating around the city.  In some neighborhoods, sidewalk cafes, public benches, beer gardens, or terraces seemed to be at every turn.  But what surprised me even more than the sheer amount of seating, was the seemingly ad-hoc, improvised, or innovative nature of many of the options.  Anywhere there was a surface or some extra space, you were bound to find a cushion, a folding chair, a crate, or some recycled materials inviting you to sit down and take a break.  It wasn’t limited to restaurants and bars either - cushions and chairs could be found on the steps, ledges, sidewalks, and street corners outside of clothing stores, gift shops, and all sorts of other random places.

My visit was in April, presumably the time of year when these chairs and cushions first emerge from winter storage.  I’d be curious to take walk through the city in summertime to see them in greater use, and to see if even more sprout up.  It must create an impressively vibrant street life.

Photos taken April, 2014

Discounted and matches appropriately. Cheers Barry.

Out of all the things that orbit Earth I’d say the moon is probably the most beautiful

newurbanismfilmfestival:

maptitude1:

This time lapse gif shows the changing course of a river over 28 years.

A river runs through it. Better go catch it!

newurbanismfilmfestival:

maptitude1:

This time lapse gif shows the changing course of a river over 28 years.

A river runs through it. Better go catch it!

(Source: reddit.com)

bobbycaputo:

The Intricate, Beautiful Patterns of Civilization Seen From Above

umans love to tease signals from noise. We see a man in the moon, Mother Mary in a piece of toast, Lady Luck in a winning run at the casino. Alex MacLean deftly plays to this tendency in his stunning aerial photos that reveal patterns in seemingly mundane things.

MacLean leans from the window of an airplane to snap tightly arranged photos of urban, industrial and wild environments. The vantage point is low enough to make out the people and places on the ground, but high enough to see their organization within the broader landscape. His photos provide our appetite for patterns several layers of interpretation to chew on, while exploring the impact of things like urban sprawl, pollution and resource extraction.

“Through sort of abstract and engaging patterns, those things will draw people into it, and hopefully think about these issues,” he says. “It really is about combining art and information. Some of it is sort of subliminal–you can’t quite put your finger on it but it sort of draws you in and engages you.”

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